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== Ethan Yoo ==
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Pronouns: he/him/his

Breonna Taylor; School attendance; Banning fracking; 988 phone number

Tags: Black Lives Matter. Climate crisis. COVID-19. Education. Mental health. Public policy.

Cozzarelli, T., & Brain, E. (2020, September 23). Louisville court rules that Breonna Taylor’s life doesn’t matter. Left Voice.

Hankison’s charge does not even acknowledge that Breonna Taylor was murdered. The “wanton endangerment” charge is not for shooting into Taylor’s apartment, but into the apartments of three of her neighbors. This is not justice for Breonna Taylor.

Goodnough, A. (2020, September 22). As schools go remote, finding ‘lost’ students gets harder. The New York Times.

Data on why students disappear from virtual school is hard to come by, but there are some obvious explanations. Many lack a computer or stable internet; others have to work or care for younger children; some families were evicted and had to move. […] Long Beach, Calif., a district of 81,000 students, won a grant last year to help students at risk of becoming chronically absent and had been honing interventions before the pandemic set in. Erin Simon, an assistant superintendent, said that instead of warning letters for missing too much school this year, students would get “re-engagement letters.”

Savage, L. (2020, September 21). Joe Biden is wrong. Believing in science means banning fracking. Jacobin.

As Mitch Jones of Food & Water Watch put it: “Having a fracking ban as a component of your climate plan is a litmus test for how seriously you’re taking the problem of climate change.” Without that, he added, “you have no way to seriously reduce greenhouse gas emissions that we have at the rate we need to do it.” By refusing to embrace a fracking ban, Biden is following the well-trodden liberal path of rhetorically acknowledging the threat posed by climate change, while rejecting the measures necessary to actually deal with it.

Vibrant Emotional Health. (2020, September 21). Statement regarding the National Suicide Hotline Designation Act receiving congressional approval [Press release].

We look forward to working with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the FCC and others to ensure that the 988 phone number, and the necessary infrastructure to support this essential service, are available to the public on or before July 16, 2022. Until that time, we encourage people in need of support to continue calling the Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.